Here is my “diagram” to illustrate how the following terms are related to my practice.

  • Open education in schools
  • MOOCs
  • Distance education
  • Open learning
  • E-learning

 

Open Concepts

Interrelated Open Concepts

In schools, educators use tools of e-learning and distance education (among others) to “teach” their students. E-learning is used in distance and in-person education (not represented well in the diagram – sorry). Open learning opens a new world of possibilities for educators who embrace it in any setting. However, open learning happens everywhere and is not restricted to schools. MOOCs can be accessed by anyone for professional development, but are seen as “out there” in the universe of open learning. To me, they are somewhat isolated and play a smaller role in education than the other terms.

 

Note: tools and background images from Pixabay.

 

Categories: #makingsense18Open Ed

NurseKillam

Laura Killam is an experienced nursing educator from Northern Ontario with a keen interest in improving student learning through innovation. For more information please visit http://nursekillam.com/.

4 Comments

Irwin DeVries · June 3, 2018 at 12:22 pm

Laura, great graphic and explanation. I particularly appreciate how you differentiate the broader philosophy of open learning and some of the tools and techniques that can be used to enable it. Both distance education and e-learning can be closed or open, and they are both technologically enhanced. MOOCs, in spite of the “open” in their name, range from very open (especially earlier cMOOC configurations) to proprietary and closed in numerous ways.

Irwin DeVries · June 3, 2018 at 12:44 pm

Hi Laura, that’s a great graphic. I agree, open learning is a broader concept that can underlie any number of tools and techniques, including a variety of distance education and e-learning approaches. While MOOCs have a potential to be part of the open learning universe, they can range from wide open (e.g. early c-MOOCs) to proprietary and closed in a number of ways.

Irwin DeVries · June 3, 2018 at 12:49 pm

Laura, great graphic and explanation. I particularly appreciate how you differentiate the broader philosophy of open learning and some of the tools and techniques that can be used to enable it. Both distance education and e-learning can be closed or open, and they are both technologically enhanced. MOOCs, in spite of the “open” in their name, range from very open (especially earlier cMOOC configurations) to proprietary and closed in numerous ways.

    NurseKillam · June 3, 2018 at 6:06 pm

    Great point. I dislike the “open” MOOCS that want you to pay for something … I never get those certificates. It isn’t truly open, but it can still be useful. Maybe it is a good business model for sustainability.

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